Author: Harold Jayda

When Should Parents Allow Their Daughters To Put On Make-Up?

When Should Parents Allow Their Daughters To Put On Make-Up?

Young Girl Wearing Make Up

 

Most of the women I see on the street walk around the world with make-up on. Some more, some less. But by the 9th grade at the latest, every girl knows what a concealer is and what you use the highlighter for. And YouTube make-up tutorials are already known in elementary school… not to mention permanent eyeliners (visit https://www.foreverstudios.co.uk/pmu/eyeliner/ for more info).

This raises the following question for me:

When should children be allowed to put on make-up?

The make-up is everywhere!

Make-up is an omnipresent part of the world in today’s world. He is in almost every household and accompanies us every step of the way. We see advertising of make-up on TV, on advertising columns and on the stack of magazines during visits to the doctor. Even when shopping for drugstores, a whole wall full of make-up kills us. Is it even possible to escape make-up?

Social pressure when everyone else is already putting on make-up

I am the absolute late bloomer when it comes to make-up. My parents were against me putting on make-up because they thought it would ruin my natural beauty. I, on the other hand, felt trapped in a quandary.

If everyone does it, you quickly become an outsider if you don’t join. These can be banal things. If all other girls already wear a bra or have a period beforehand, girls often have a feeling of otherness.

With make-up, however, this is such a thing, because you do not have to wait for a physical development. You can make up everything that has a face!

Is there any point in parents forbidding their children to put on make-up?

As I said, my parents weren’t thrilled with the idea that I would put on makeup, even though I was already 14/15. Sometimes I was allowed to – on special occasions such as birthdays or the like. But it was taboo to go to school with make-up on!

Unfortunately, bans rarely bring anything to pubertal teenagers. Of course, I did it anyway. Early in the morning I put on make-up downstairs in the guest toilet and was the first to go to the door so that no one saw me. It wasn’t much, just a little mascara and lipstick. After school, I put on make-up with a few make-up wipes. That’s how I did it – for about half a year.

 

ALSO READ: Smart Parenting Tips for Your Child’s Oral Health

 

Is there a “too early” make-up?

It is not uncommon for me to meet 10-year-old girls in my environment who try their hand at lip gloss and blush. The thought “too early” comes up in me instinctively, but is it really? After all, I don’t want them to do the same secrecy as I did back then. Nowadays I have the feeling that “everything” starts much earlier anyway.

Show them how to put on make-up!

What do you think of it when you, the parents, teach the kids how to handle make-up properly? How to use the Eyliner and with what swing to apply the mascara?

Unfortunately, I still have some very embarrassing photos in which I painted my eyes very dark and I had a bit like the guitarist of a punk rock band. I would have liked someone to show me how the rabbit runs!

When should children be allowed to put on make-up?

There is probably no right answer to this. After all, adults also put on make-up. It’s probably best for parents to put themselves in their children’s shoes. The question of “why” usually explains almost everything.

If you are strictly against it for various reasons, then you absolutely have to teach the children in a neutral way. Fobing them off with a “because I say it” probably won’t stop them. I would also suggest that you and you carefully approach the make-up. In this case, the kids can only make up discreetly for the time being, before they later become “more colorful”!

 

Smart Parenting Tips for Your Child’s Oral Health

Smart Parenting Tips for Your Child’s Oral Health

Father brushing his teeth with his son

 

Good oral care for children is important from an early age. Children with healthy (milk) teeth have a greater chance of good teeth as an adult. Children are also at greater risk of cavities because their enamel has not yet hardened. The Phoenix dentist is happy to give you several tips for oral care for children.

Brushing teeth

Once your child has a first tooth, it’s important to start brushing his or her teeth. To do this, use a small toothbrush with soft bristles. Also, use fluoride toothpaste, but make sure that the toothpaste contains the right amount of fluoride that fits the age of your child. An excessive amount of fluoride can be harmful.

How and how often you should brush your child’s teeth depends on his or her age. We recommend the following:

  • 0 to 24 months: brush the teeth 1 time a day, preferably after the last feeding. Also gently massage the gums.
  • 2 to 4 years: brush the teeth 2 times a day, preferably after breakfast and before bedtime. Also, start teaching your child how to brush their teeth themselves.
  • 4 to 6 years: have your child brush their teeth twice a day under supervision, preferably after breakfast and before bedtime. Make sure that the back molars are also well polished, at this age the first permanent molars come through and these are extra sensitive to cavities.
  • From 6 years: have your child brush your teeth twice a day, preferably after breakfast and before bedtime. We recommend brushing the teeth once a day for up to ten years. At this age, you can also teach your child to floss and an electric toothbrush may be used.

 

ALSO READ: Knowing More About Authoritative Parenting

 

Pay attention to nutrition

Not only brushing teeth but also nutrition has a major impact on the health of your child’s teeth. Cavities are often caused by wrong eating and drinking habits. Baby bottles and spout cups give the biggest problems because children suck on them for a long time. That is why it is preferable to switch to a cup as quickly as possible.

Be further careful with sugary or acidic products. Because the enamel of children has not yet hardened, these products can cause damage to the teeth.

Visit the dental hygienist

It is often thought that a visit to the dental hygienist is only intended for adults, but children are also welcome at the dental hygienist from the moment the first teeth are through. By introducing your child to a dental hygienist from an early age, you can prevent many problems in the future. The dental hygienist can also give you tips on, among other things, brushing teeth, additional oral care, and the importance of nutrition.

A check-up at the dentist

It is recommended to visit the dentist twice a year with children from the age of one year. The dentist checks your child’s teeth for cavities and can perform a fluorine treatment.