Full-Time Jobs for Pre-School Children Because of Autism???

(This post is also published on the Autism Women’s Network page.) Long before the day we received a formal autism diagnosis, I already knew my daughter was autistic. I hadn’t picked it up at first – not because the signs weren’t there, because they were, but because I didn’t see anything problematic in those signs. […]

On a pale yellow circle, text says: when I stopped trying not to stick out, I found a place where I truly fit in.

On the wild path

I never thought of myself as radical. If anything I spent most of my life trying to somehow fit in, even when it seemed impossible. By fitting in, I really meant not sticking out. In my mind it seemed that if I could achieve the latter, perhaps the former would follow suit. As the years […]

Image is a word meme with rainbow-coloured text on a white background: I propose the possibility that, while we continue to force autistic people to jump through our hoops; while we continue to induce high anxiety in autistic people by trying to push them into certain scenarios; while we continue placing them into schools and therapy centres that are, by their very nature and structure, inappropriate for autistic people; while we continue using a non-autistic yardstick as a measure of success; while we continue to draw big conclusions based on outer markers over inner being; while we continue to allow non-autistic people to make important judgments and start research projects and write diagnostic criteria and design treatment models based upon their own neurology; while we continue to allow non-autistic people to stigmatise and stereotype being autistic; while we continue to believe that being autistic means that there is something &#39wrong&#39 with you - we have no real idea what autistic people are capable of.

Possibilities.

I am a mama in an unschooling family. If you haven’t heard of unschooling or don’t really know what it is, I will briefly describe the philosophy and base beliefs behind it. Unschooling believes that with an opportune and rich environment, and with involved and loving parents (or other caregivers), children will thrive and learn […]

Image is my blond haired daughter from above, sitting on the outside steps eating dinosaur pasta with her fingers while wearing her favourite Spiderman outfit.

Found. Accepted. Valued.

It’s easy to feel scared for your kids when you realise they are Autistic. Pretty much everywhere you look in the mainstream media, on parent written blogs and in books by professionals calling themselves “Autism Experts” someone is referring to your child as disordered, a tragedy, a burden, difficult, part of an epidemic, or a […]